Judicial Watch • Mexican Border Crime Underreported

Mexican Border Crime Underreported

Mexican Border Crime Underreported

MAY 09, 2011

The Obama Administration is deceiving Americans by underreporting serious crime along the Mexican border, according to the Texas lawmaker who chairs a congressional Homeland Security committee.Federal, state and local law enforcement officials who deal firsthand with violent Mexican drug cartels will deliver testimony to prove it at a special committee hearing this week titled “On the Border and in the Line of Fire: U.S. Law Enforcement, Homeland Security and Drug Cartel Violence.”Authorities at every level will tell the “real story” of how they are “outmanned, overpowered and in danger of losing control” of communities to “narco-terrorists,” says Michael McCaul, the Texas congressman who chairs the House Committee on Homeland Security. The lawmaker asserts that the Obama Administration “is not giving the American people a complete picture of security on our border with Mexico” and that data on crimes and violence along the southern border is “deceiving and underreported.”Among those scheduled to speak at Wednesday’s hearing in Washington D.C. are the director of the Department of Homeland Security’s counter narcotics enforcement office, the head of the Texas Department of Public Safety, Arizona’s attorney general and the sheriff of Zapata County Texas. Their testimony will contradict Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano’s claim that security along the Mexican border is “better now than it has ever been,” McCaul says.The House Homeland Security committee held a similar hearing in late March to address the crisis along the southwest border. A top Homeland Security official delivered gripping information outlining how Mexcian cartel drugs, money and weapons are part of a “complex interconnected system of illicit pathways and transitional criminal organizations that span the globe.”In a separate but related story on the administration’s handling of border security, Arizonalawmakers are seeking online donations to build fencing along the border with Mexicosince the federal government won’t do it. The plan includes using prison labor and launching a website to help raise money for the project. The state is already using donated funds to defend its immigration control law from the Obama Administration’s legal challenges.

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