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Judicial Watch • More Gitmo Prisoners Return To Terrorism

More Gitmo Prisoners Return To Terrorism

More Gitmo Prisoners Return To Terrorism

MARCH 29, 2010


As President Obama restores America’s “moral high ground” by freeing Guantanamo Bay prisoners, the list of detainees that return to terrorism after being released continues to grow sharply.

Last year the Pentagon revealed that the number of Middle Eastern terrorists who rejoined “the fight” after leaving the military prison nearly doubled in a short time. Among them was an Al Qaeda leader (Said Ali al-Shihri) who masterminded a U.S. Embassy bombing in Yemen’s capital after being released. Like many of the detainees, al-Shihri went through an Obama-backed Saudi Arabian “rehabilitation” program that supposedly reforms jihadists but instead has served as a training camp for future terrorists.

As the administration frees more detainees, the list of those who rejoin extremist missions is predictably growing. More than 100 have returned to terrorism recently and 30-40% of all released prisoners are active in terrorist causes, according to a Green Beret Lieutenant Colonel cited in a national news report. A lot of them go underground, change their name and hide out before surfacing again, the Lieutenant Colonel says.

Adding insult to injury, many of the U.S.-hating Middle Eastern radicals who actively train to kill Americans benefit from generous medical treatments during their incarceration, compliments of Uncle Sam. Among them is Abdullah Mehsud (also known as Said Mohammed Alim Shah), who got a $75,000 prosthetic leg before leaving U.S. custody. After his release he directed an attack that killed 31 people in Pakistan and a few months later blew himself up to avoid capture.

U.S. taxpayers have also bought laptops and computer lessons for Guantanamo terrorists so that they can be reintroduced into a modern society when the president fulfills his campaign promise of releasing them. The U.S. military actually set up a sophisticated computer lab for the detainees, who also get phones and fast-food takeout, to send electronic mail and receive language and basic user skills to assist them in finding jobs once freed.

There are still around 170 prisoners at Guantanamo and even the president and some of his ultraliberal allies in Congress acknowledge some are far too dangerous to be released. In some cases the courts may lend a hand as they have dozens of times. In the last few months alone, different federal judges have ordered the release of two top Al Qaeda operatives. One of them (Mohamedou Slahi) recruited most of the 9/11 hijackers and the other (Saeed Mohammed Saleh Hatim) fought against U.S. and coalition forces in Afghanistan.


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