Judicial Watch • No. of Saudi Students in U.S. Doubles in 2 Years

No. of Saudi Students in U.S. Doubles in 2 Years

No. of Saudi Students in U.S. Doubles in 2 Years

NOVEMBER 25, 2013

The Obama administration is allowing a growing number of students from Saudi Arabia to enroll in colleges around the nation even though most of the 9/11 hijackers were from that Islamic country and visas were dramatically cut in the aftermath of the attacks.

Nevertheless, from 2010 to 2012 the number of Saudi Arabians permitted to study in the U.S. doubled, according to a mainstream newspaper report that cites a survey using State Department figures. Last year alone, the number of Saudi students in the U.S. grew to 44,566, an increase of nearly 30% from 2011.

One public university in southern California reports that it has nearly three times the amount of Saudi students than it had in 2010. The drastic increase is attributed to a new Saudi Arabian scholarship program—largely financed by the Islamic government—that encourages students to study abroad. However, this has been going on for years. Osama bin Laden’s billionaire dad sent more than a quarter of his 54 kids to study in America and other foreign countries, the news article points out attributing the information to a book (“The Bin Ladens”) about the family’s history.

The U.S. government drastically slashed the number of Saudi students allowed to enter the country after the 2001 terrorist attacks. Fifteen of the 19 hijackers were Saudis and many studied aviation in the United States under a fraud-infested student visa program operated by the State Department. It approved applications for a number of the 9/11 terrorists to enter and live in the U.S. by enrolling in aviation and language schools throughout the country.

They are not the only terrorists who entered the U.S. under this student visa program. Here is a recent example; a 22-year-old Texas Tech student, Khalid Ali-M Aldawsari, who was sentenced to life in prison after getting convicted for masterminding a bomb plot. His goal was to carry out jihad in Lubbok, a city in the northwestern part of the state. The FBI said Aldawsari
researched online how to construct an improvised explosive device (IED) using chemicals and that he had acquired most of the ingredients. He also researched several potential U.S. targets, according to the feds.

The Obama administration seems to be bending over backwards to appease the Saudis. Earlier this year it quietly rewarded the Middle Eastern country with a special travel privilege that allows its nationals to bypass normal passport security controls at major U.S. airports. It marks the first time that the Saudi government has a direct role in vetting who is eligible for fast-tracked entry into the United States. It’s a bizarre move considering that just three years ago the U.S. government actually placed Saudi Arabia on a list of 14 countries whose travelers would face enhanced security when entering the country. Why? Because a Saudi national named Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab tried to blow up a Detroit-bound U.S. commercial airliner on Christmas Day in 2009.

Here’s another huge concern; a boatload of money flows from Saudi Arabia to finance international terrorist activities. In fact, a report published by the Congressional Research Service says “Saudi donors and unregulated charities have been a major source of financing to extremist and terrorist groups over the past 25 years.” It also reveals that Saudi Arabia “was a place where Al Qaeda raised money directly from individuals and through charities” and that “charities with significant Saudi government sponsorship” may have diverted funding to Al Qaeda. Considering these alarming facts, it’s definitely not a good idea to relax security standards for Saudi Arabians who want to come to the United States.

 

 

 

 

 

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  • Prospector69

    Anyone wanting a visa should be carefully checked out before they get into the US. As I understand the foreign visa student application process, the local in country Embassy or consulate relies on the host government to do a background check and provide that assessment to the US Embassy or consulate and then they decide who gets the visas. The problem is that in many countries, money changes hands and parts of the background check information is deleted or changed prior to being furnished for our perusal!