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Judicial Watch • Illegal Alien Who Butchered Conn. Woman Not Deported After Serving 15 Yrs. for Murder Because Haiti Refused to Repatriate

Illegal Alien Who Butchered Conn. Woman Not Deported After Serving 15 Yrs. for Murder Because Haiti Refused to Repatriate

Illegal Alien Who Butchered Conn. Woman Not Deported After Serving 15 Yrs. for Murder Because Haiti Refused to Repatriate

JUNE 24, 2016

An illegal immigrant who stabbed a young Connecticut woman to death after completing a 15-year sentence for murder couldn’t be deported by the U.S. government because his homeland, which receives billions in aid from Uncle Sam, wouldn’t take him back—three times! So federal authorities released the violent criminal, a Haitian national, and didn’t even bother tracking his whereabouts allowing him to commit yet another heinous crime.

Now, a year after an innocent woman was viciously butchered to death in her own apartment, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is getting a bit of a spanking from its watchdog for failing to do its job. It’s a sad old story, but this one is extra special because the DHS agency, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), responsible for deporting the murderous thug (Jean Jacques) claims Haiti simply refused to take him—on three different occasions. In fact, Jacques was listed as a passenger on three flights to Haiti but the Haitian government refused to repatriate him. U.S. authorities followed the orders of a famously corrupt, third-world country that gets billions in “humanitarian” aid from American taxpayers and Jacques was released to kill again.

As unbelievable as this may sound, it’s the somber reality of an agency created after 9/11 to keep the nation safe. A few years after coming to the U.S. in the early 1990s Jacques went on a crime spree and was convicted of attempted murder and illegally possessing a gun. He was sentenced to 20 years but got out after serving 15 and was jailed again for violating the terms of his parole before getting released for good in January of 2015. Six months later he stabbed 25-year-old Casey Chadwick to death in Norwich, a city of about 40,000 residents. Connecticut has long protected illegal immigrants with sanctuary policies and even offers them special drivers’ licenses, but the gruesome crime ignited fury and the state’s congressional delegation—all Democrats and avid defenders of sanctuary measures—demanded that the DHS Inspector General conduct an investigation.

The DHS watchdog reluctantly put it on its lengthy list of “ongoing projects” earlier this year and the findings were made public in a scathing report issued this month. The IG blasts ICE for not doing more to remove Jacques from the country and failing to contact the Haitian consulate in Miami, Florida to request a travel document after Jacques’ third repatriation rejection. “There is no record that ICE ERO (Enforcement and Removal Operations) made this request,” the report states, adding that “ERO officials had previously made hundreds of similar requests to the Haitian consulates for travel documents without success and we have no reason to believe that the Jacques matter would have been different.” ICE didn’t bother asking the State Department for help because it believed the agency’s involvement was typically limited to aliens engaged in terrorism or human rights violations, the report says. Once released Jacques supervision was “minimal and ineffective,” the DHS watchdog found.

Unfortunately, this is not an isolated case. In the last few years illegal immigrants with lengthy criminal histories have been allowed to remain in the U.S. despite being repeat offenders. Judicial Watch has investigated several of the cases and obtained public records from the government. For instance, back in 2008 Judicial Watch launched a California public records request with the San Francisco Sheriff’s Department to obtain the arrest and booking information on Edwin Ramos, an illegal alien from El Salvador who murdered three innocent American citizens. Ramos was a member of a renowned violent street gang and had been convicted of two felonies as a juvenile (a gang-related assault on a bus passenger and the attempted robbery of a pregnant woman) yet he was allowed to remain in the country.

Judicial Watch also investigated the 2010 case of a drunken illegal alien who killed a nun in Virginia and sued DHS to obtain records. The Bolivian national, Carlos Montano, had a criminal history but federal authorities released him on his own recognizance after two previous arrests. Judicial Watch’s probe determined that Montano had a revoked license and had previously been arrested on drunk-driving charges when his car crossed a median and slammed into a vehicle carrying three nuns. The two survivors were critically injured. Local police said they had turned Montano over to ICE after at least one of his arrests, but he never got deported.

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