Judicial Watch • Memo Shows Obama Administration Granted Deportation Stay to President’s Illegal Alien Uncle Onyango Obama

Memo Shows Obama Administration Granted Deportation Stay to President’s Illegal Alien Uncle Onyango Obama

Memo Shows Obama Administration Granted Deportation Stay to President’s Illegal Alien Uncle Onyango Obama

JULY 16, 2012

Documents Shows ICE Leadership Tracked Politically Sensitive Case

(Washington, DC) – Judicial Watch, the organization that investigates and fights government corruption, announced today that it has uncovered a new record from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) regarding President Obama’s illegal alien uncle, Onyango Obama, who was arrested in August 2011 on drunken driving charges in Framingham, Massachusetts.

The document, obtained pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit filed on April 10, 2012, includes an internal agency email from Brian Hale, ICE’s Assistant Director of the Office of Public Affairs, to ICE Director John Morton dated April 1, 2012, titled “Onyango Statement and TP’s [Talking Points].” The email (on page 43) confirms that the ICE curiously permitted Onyango to seek the reopening of his deportation proceedings closed in 1992:

Mr. Onyango is subject to a final order of deportation. ICE had granted him a stay of deportation effective until June 5, 2012.

The stay was granted to allow him to attend pending criminal proceedings and to seek reopening of his deportation proceedings, which concluded before the Board of Immigration Appeals on January 29, 1992.

On March 27, 2012, the Framingham Massachusetts District Court entered its judgment in Mr. Onyango’s criminal case. Since his criminal case has concluded and his attorney appears not to have filed a motion to reopen, ICE is requiring Mr. Onyango to report to our Office of Enforcement and Removal Operations in Burlington, MA on April 12,2012 at 10:30 a.m. with his attorney of record.

At that appointment, arrangements, including medical accommodations, will be discussed to effectuate his departure from the United States on an appropriate date.

Absent a change in circumstances, ICE does not intend to deport him at the time of his April 12 appointment.

Onyango was first ordered out of the country in 1989.

On March 27, 2012, Onyango Obama admitted to the Framingham District Court that prosecutors had enough evidence to convict him. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials, meanwhile, claimed the agency intended to continue deportation proceedings against Obama, however, they allowed Onyango to seek the reopening of his deportation proceedings.

Obama, who, upon his arrest, said his one phone call would be to the White House, has indicated he will fight ICE’s efforts to deport him in a high profile proceeding the Boston Herald conjectured could “drag on for years.” While he fights deportation, Obama will be allowed to drive a car.  He was supposed to lose his license for 45 days, but received a “hardship license,” from the Massachusetts’s Department of Motor Vehicles so that he could drive back and forth to his job at a liquor store.

On July 12, Judicial Watch released records showing agency officials withholding information on Onyango’s release from the press and Congress.

“It certainly appears that Obama’s uncle is receiving favorable treatment from the Obama administration, which explains that we had to sue in federal court to obtain this material,” said Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton. “ICE should have deported Onyango immediately, especially after his DUI. We now know that the Obama administration decided not to deport Obama’s uncle despite his being a criminal and being on the lam for at least 20 years.”

As Director of ICE, John Morton has led the implementation of President Obama’s illegal alien amnesty program. On June 30, 2010, Morton sent a memo to all ICE employees instructing local immigration officials to use their discretion in “prioritizing” illegal immigration deportation cases. On June 17, 2011, John Morton followed up with another memo to all field officers, special agents and to the chief counsel further defining the term “prosecutorial discretion,” which, in essence, asked immigration officials to focus deportation proceedings on illegal aliens convicted of crimes.

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